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REMEMBER THE PENTECOST


e-mail: savefawley@hotmail.com 







Sunday, 24.May 2009
Źródło: www.dziennikpolski.co.uk
autor: Jan Maria Borkowski

translated from Polish by Elżbieta Kowalska

Remember the Pentecost!
Sunday, 24 May 2009
Source: www.dziennikpolski.co.uk
Author: Jan Maria Borkowski

Remember the Pentecost!

The sale of the Fawley Court property in Henley-on-Thames by the Marian Fathers has recently been a recurrent topic of conversations among the Polish Community living in Great Britain.
The Poles are now astonished to discover how this place is now destined to be erased from Polish National Heritage in Great Britain even though it was rebuilt, recreated and generously supported by the Polish Community for many years. There are rumours of transferring the church of St. Anne to secular use and moving the grave of its founder, Prince Stanislaw Radziwill, to another place. Father Jarzebowski who dedicated a good part of his life to establishing Fawley Court as a Polish educational and national centre is also now destined to have his remains moved elsewhere.
As this sacred place gradually becomes more profane, the Poles are left with nothing but prayer to help prevent the sale of Fawley Court and thereby keep it in their hands.
There might still be a chance to prevent the sale of Fawley Court despite the advanced stage of the sale.
It is imperative for the Poles to form a united front and publicly protest against the Marian Fathers decision to sell the property especially without consulting any representatives of the Polish Community in emigration. Let us therefore gather together in Fawley Court on Pentecost Day on the 31 of May. We will gather together in accordance with our tradition, in our thousands, on the magnificent lawns designed by Capability Brown.
We still have a right to attend mass at the church on such an important occasion even though the Marian Fathers have not invited us and we are not welcome anymore. Let us gather in this place once again and pray for some consensus to be reached by the Marian Fathers and our Polish Community.
Fawley Court is extremely important to the Poles not only because of its glorious past but also because of its future. It is regrettable that the Marian Fathers, who once dedicated their efforts towards serving the Polish community, no longer feel obliged to fulfil their mission towards the Polish community. They do not seem to notice that a new wave of Polish emigrants has resulted in a resurge of Catholicism in Great Britain – a phenomenon often described as a religious renaissance. The Marian Fathers seem to be uninterested in taking pastoral care of vulnerable young families, new to the community, who require spiritual support as well as an opportunity to integrate with their compatriots and therby share their spiritual values with the English society.
How could this be the right time to close down the Retreat Center and move the Divine Mercy Shrine to Ealing when there are so many people that require it to remain where it is? I do not attempt to provide solution for this disgraceful situation but dare say that we Poles require courage similar to that of Father Jarzebowski if we are to resolve this problem.
Some fifty years ago, Father Jarzebowski bravely took on the changing task of turning the rumbling old palace in Fawley Court, whose history dates back to the 11th century and whose manor house was designed by the world famous Christopher Wren, into a Polish cultural and religious centre.
There were merely 150 thousand Polish people in Great Britain in those days. Despite such small numbers, their generous support and financial contributions enabled the opening of a Polish School for their children as well as the establishment of a magnificent library and museum containing a unique collection of historic memorabilia.
The school was in operation until 1986 when it was closed down during the course of academic year. The museum was also shut down and its treasures were removed from Fawley Court and transferred to Lichen (Poland). This was shamefully done without consulting the very Poles that donated most of the collected items. The library suffered similar fate.
All these wrongdoings contrast sharply with the good deeds of Father Jarzebowski. He was a great man whose experience in education had been gained in a pre-War Marian school in Bielany, Warsaw, and for whom national heritage, patriotic education and the catholic faith had amalgamated into one missionary guideline.
There are currently 2 million of Poles living in Great Britain. Most of these Poles are young, vibrant and proud of their culture and their origin with hope for their future in this country. The Marian Fathers have however chosen not to take up this missionary challenge or perhaps they simply do not possess the necessary ‘know-how’ to build upon the foundation left to them by their predecessors.
Moreover, the Marian Fathers have absolutely no right to make decisions regarding our common property and heritage as they please and betray those who trusted them when contributing to Fawley Court thought the decades.
We hope that the idea of Divine Mercy becomes a basis for a spiritual renaissance in Europe. The idea is based on the revelations of St. Faustyna and later explained in a written treaty by her confessor, Father Sopocko.
It is extremely significant that the original of this particular treaty was entrusted to Father Jarzebowski shortly after the War in Vilnius (then Poland) and later smuggled by him throughout Vladivostock (Russia) to Western Europe. For this reason we feel that the Divine Mercy Shrine should remain in Fawley Court permanently as an anchor of Polish and catholic spirituality. As the Polish Community in Britain is now much larger it is more able to support the continuation of Father Jarzebowski’s mission. I therefore appeal to you, my fellow country men and women, to attend the Holy Mass in the St. Anne’s Church in Fawley Court on the occasion of Pentecost Day on the 31st of May. Together we will pray at the grave of Father Jarzebowski , Prince Radziwill, and all those whose ashes have been buried here and whose great contribution to this place cannot be forgotten but should instead be remembered in order to give us hope for the future.



The sale of the Fawley Court property in Henley-on-Thames by the Marian Fathers has recently been a recurrent topic of conversations among the Polish Community living in Great Britain.
The Poles are now astonished to discover how this place is now destined to be erased from Polish National Heritage in Great Britain even though it was rebuilt, recreated and generously supported by the Polish Community for many years. There are rumours of transferring the church of St. Anne to secular use and moving the grave of its founder, Prince Stanislaw Radziwill, to another place. Father Jarzebowski who dedicated a good part of his life to establishing Fawley Court as a Polish educational and national centre is also now destined to have his remains moved elsewhere.
As this sacred place gradually becomes more profane, the Poles are left with nothing but prayer to help prevent the sale of Fawley Court and thereby keep it in their hands.
There might still be a chance to prevent the sale of Fawley Court despite the advanced stage of the sale.
It is imperative for the Poles to form a united front and publicly protest against the Marian Fathers decision to sell the property especially without consulting any representatives of the Polish Community in emigration. Let us therefore gather together in Fawley Court on Pentecost Day on the 31 of May. We will gather together in accordance with our tradition, in our thousands, on the magnificent lawns designed by Capability Brown.
We still have a right to attend mass at the church on such an important occasion even though the Marian Fathers have not invited us and we are not welcome anymore. Let us gather in this place once again and pray for some consensus to be reached by the Marian Fathers and our Polish Community.

Fawley Court is extremely important to the Poles not only because of its glorious past but also because of its future. It is regrettable that the Marian Fathers, who once dedicated their efforts towards serving the Polish community, no longer feel obliged to fulfil their mission towards the Polish community. They do not seem to notice that a new wave of Polish emigrants has resulted in a resurge of Catholicism in Great Britain – a phenomenon often described as a religious renaissance. The Marian Fathers seem to be uninterested in taking pastoral care of vulnerable young families, new to the community, who require spiritual support as well as an opportunity to integrate with their compatriots and therby share their spiritual values with the English society.
How could this be the right time to close down the Retreat Center and move the Divine Mercy Shrine to Ealing when there are so many people that require it to remain where it is? I do not attempt to provide solution for this disgraceful situation but dare say that we Poles require courage similar to that of Father Jarzebowski if we are to resolve this problem.
Some fifty years ago, Father Jarzebowski bravely took on the changing task of turning the rumbling old palace in Fawley Court, whose history dates back to the 11th century and whose manor house was designed by the world famous Christopher Wren, into a Polish cultural and religious centre.
There were merely 150 thousand Polish people in Great Britain in those days. Despite such small numbers, their generous support and financial contributions enabled the opening of a Polish School for their children as well as the establishment of a magnificent library and museum containing a unique collection of historic memorabilia.
The school was in operation until 1986 when it was closed down during the course of academic year. The museum was also shut down and its treasures were removed from Fawley Court and transferred to Lichen (Poland). This was shamefully done without consulting the very Poles that donated most of the collected items. The library suffered similar fate.
All these wrongdoings contrast sharply with the good deeds of Father Jarzebowski. He was a great man whose experience in education had been gained in a pre-War Marian school in Bielany, Warsaw, and for whom national heritage, patriotic education and the catholic faith had amalgamated into one missionary guideline.
There are currently 2 million of Poles living in Great Britain. Most of these Poles are young, vibrant and proud of their culture and their origin with hope for their future in this country. The Marian Fathers have however chosen not to take up this missionary challenge or perhaps they simply do not possess the necessary ‘know-how’ to build upon the foundation left to them by their predecessors.
Moreover, the Marian Fathers have absolutely no right to make decisions regarding our common property and heritage as they please and betray those who trusted them when contributing to Fawley Court thought the decades.
We hope that the idea of Divine Mercy becomes a basis for a spiritual renaissance in Europe. The idea is based on the revelations of St. Faustyna and later explained in a written treaty by her confessor, Father Sopocko.
It is extremely significant that the original of this particular treaty was entrusted to Father Jarzebowski shortly after the War in Vilnius (then Poland) and later smuggled by him throughout Vladivostock (Russia) to Western Europe. For this reason we feel that the Divine Mercy Shrine should remain in Fawley Court permanently as an anchor of Polish and catholic spirituality. As the Polish Community in Britain is now much larger it is more able to support the continuation of Father Jarzebowski’s mission. I therefore appeal to you, my fellow country men and women, to attend the Holy Mass in the St. Anne’s Church in Fawley Court on the occasion of Pentecost Day on the 31st of May. Together we will pray at the grave of Father Jarzebowski , Prince Radziwill, and all those whose ashes have been buried here and whose great contribution to this place cannot be forgotten but should instead be remembered in order to give us hope for the future.


Sprawa sprzedaży przez księży Marianów polskiego ośrodka w Fawley Court w Henley nad Tamizą wciąż powraca w rozmowach między mieszkającymi w Wielkiej Brytanii rodakami

Miejsce, które przez lata związane było z polskością i do którego odbudowy i utrzymania społeczność polska tak walnie się przyczyniła ma zostać wymazane z mapy naszego duchowego dziedzictwa na Brytyjskich Wyspach. Mówi się już o dekonsekracji zaprojektowanego przez Władysława Jarosza i ufundowanego przez księcia Stanisława Radziwiłła kościoła, o przeniesieniu grobu księcia i innych, łącznie z grobem ojca Józefa Jarzębowskiego, dzięki którego energii, wierze i patriotyzmowi przed 50 laty Fawley Court stało się miejscem tak drogim Polakom na obczyźnie. Czy pozostało nam już tylko modlić się o jego interwencję z zaświatow i apelować do Boskiego Miłosierdzia, by wspomogło tych którzy chcą zachować polski i katolicki Fawley Court?

Sprawa kasacji tutejszego ośrodka choć bardzo już zaawansowana nie jest jednak ostatecznie przegrana. Wciąż potrzeba publicznych manifestacji by pokazać jak bardzo wszystkim nam na sercu leży ta sprawa, jak oburza dysponowanie dorobkiem emigracji bez należytej konsultacji z jej przedstawicielami. Przyjedźmy do Fawley Court na mszę w niedzielę Zesłania Ducha Swiętego 31 maja, święto przez lata tak uroczyście tu celebrowane, z którego okazji tysiące Polaków zjawiały się na zielonych łąkach wspaniałego parku zaplanowanego przez samego Capability Browna. Dziś się tu już nas nie zaprasza, ale wstępu do kościoła zabronić nie można. Przyjedźmy modlić się o porozumienie i przekazanie ośrodka organizacjom troszczącym się o losy polskiego dziedzictwa i duchowej kultury.


Fawley Court ważny jest dla Polaków nie tylko poprzez jego przeszłość, z której jesteśmy dumni, ale i przyszłość, która stawia nowe wyzwania. Marianie, którzy w osobie pochowanego w Fawley Court ojca Jarzębowskiego uosobiali mariaż idei ewangelizacji i wychowania w duchu chrześcijańskim z troską o przeniknięte tym duchem polskie społeczeństwo na uchodźctwie, o jego dziedzictwo i kulturę, dziś nie czują się już wobec nas zobligowani. Zrobiliśmy swoje, mamy odejść. Zdają się nie dostrzegać faktu, że renesans katolicyzmu jaki obecnie przeżywamy na Wyspach Brytyjskich jest zasługą setek tysięcy nowoprzybyłych tutaj młodych Polaków. Czy to rzeczywiście moment by myśleć zamykaniu działającego w Fawley Court Sanktuarium Miłosierdzia Bożego propagującego idee św.Faustyny i przenoszeniu go na Ealing? Czy nie czas raczej na duchowa opiekę nad rzeszami młodych Polaków i ich dzieci, na wspólne z nimi działania na rzecz integracji i duchowego odziłlywania na angielskie społeczeńtwo?

Nie mnie radzić, ale potrzeba nam dziś śmiałości i odwagi ojca Jarzębowskiego, jego troski o polską społeczność w Wielkiej Brytani i nowych śmiałych zadań dla Fawley Court. Przed 50 laty z 50 funtami w kieszeni ojciec Jarzębowski potrafił rozpocząć wielkie dzieło przemieniania upadającego starego dworu (wybudowanego przez Christophera Wrena, ale swą historią sięgającego jeszcze czasów Normanów) w ośrodek promieniowania katolickiej wiary i polskiej kultury. Na Wyspach Brytyjskich mieszkało wówczas zaledwie 150 tysięcy Polaków, a jednak przy ich wsparciu i pomocy możliwe okazało się otworzenie tu szkoły dla dzieci polskiej emigracji (zamkniętej w roku 1986 w trakcie trwania roku akademickiego), wspaniałego muzeum (w przeważającej mierze złożonego z darów polskiej emigracji, a dziś bez konsultacji z nami przeniesionego do Lichenia) i cennej biblioteki. Dla wielkiego marianina, ojca Jarzębowskiego, którego pedagogiczne doświadczenia sięgały jeszcze przedwojennej szkoły marianów na warszawskich Bielanach, wszystko to: edukcja, historia i wiara stanowiło spójną całość, wzajemnie wspomagało dzieło ewangelizacji i krzewienia kultury. Znalazła się energia i wola by wspólnie z rzeszami wygnańców-Polaków budować dzieło Ducha.

Dziś kiedy w Wielkiej Brytanii mieszka nas 2 miliony, a większość to dumni ze swej wiary i kultury ludzie młodzi, pełnych energii i nadziei, Marianie odrzucają wielką szansę i wyzwanie jakie tak bliska im przecież społeczność daje. Nie potrafią czy może niechcą budować dalej na fundamentach wzniesionych wysiłkiem poprzedniego pokolenia. Nie mają prawa rozporządzać wspólnym dorobkiem rzesz, które im zaufały i które przez dziesięciolecia przyczyniały się do stworzenia z Fawley Court centrum promieniowania kultury narodowej i jej religijnego ducha.

Czyż idee Miłosierdzia Bożego wyłożone w opartym na objawieniach św.Faustyny traktacie jej spowiednika ojca Sopoćko nie powinny stać się ostoją tak potrzebnego zadania duchowego odrodzenia Europy? Czy tylko przypadek sprawił, że to Ojcu Jarzębowskiemu powierzony został w Wilnie, zaraz po wojnie, oryginał tego traktatu i że podróżując przez Władywostok udało mu się go przemycić na Zachód? Czyż Fawley Court z tradycjami edukacji i działającym tu Sanktuarium Bożego Miłosierdzia nie powinien stać się centrum promienieniowania katolickiej duchowości i kultury? Ma po temu warunki, a polska społeczność w Wielkiej Brytanii o tyle dziś potężniejsza z pewnością mogłaby stać się oparciem dla tak śmiałych planów. Potrzeba nam kontynuatorów wizji ojca Jarzębowskiego, potrzeba miejsc jak Fawley Court tak dla integracji jak i starań o  przekazanie innym dorobku i duchowych wartości naszej kultury. Przyjedźmy więc 31 maja do Fawley Court na mszę w południe w Zielonoświątkową niedzielę, módlmy się przy grobie ojca Jarzębowskiego, księcia Radziwiłła i innych których prochy spoczywają w tutejszym kolumbarium przypomninając o wkładzie jaki Polacy tu włożyli i nadziejach jakie wciąż z tym miejscem wiążą.
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